Movie Review: Loving Vincent

My Ranking: 9/10

Loving Vincent: This is easily the most beautiful looking film of the year as it was entirely hand painted (65,000 frames in total). The stop motion piece tells the story of Armand Roulin (played by Douglas Booth) attempting to deliver Vincent van Gogh’s last letter to his brother Theo van Gogh. Along the way Roulin meets many people involved in the life of the mysterious painter, and attempts to put the pieces together of how Van Gogh died.

The story was told in an interesting way as well. When dealing with scenes in the film’s present the frames are in color. Whereas most of the scenes involving Van Gogh and the past are in black and white. It was also told in a very similar way to that of “Citizen Kane.” There is a man searching for information on a famous individual who has died. The information comes from those involved in parts of his life. All of which have different and sometimes conflicting opinions on the individual. 

One of the best parts of the film were the transitions. When moving from one scene to the next using paintings it allows the world to become warped in ways that wouldn’t look natural in a live action film. Another great aspect was Clint Mansell’s score, which is one of the better ones this year. However, not everything was great. When it comes to showing vs telling it more so did the latter, so a lot of exposition. Also since it is made entirely of paintings not every frame looks the same as the previous. So, some of the images look a little shaky and it can be a bit jarring.

Watch the trailer for Loving Vincent!

See more movie reviews by Aaron Clausen!
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Movie Review: Loving Vincent

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